Monday, November 12, 2007

Beautiful song for UPA's 65th anniversary

Ludwig in London just released a gorgeous tune by in honour of the 65th anniversary of UPA, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army. It aired on Nash Holos on Nov. 11.

In Tak Chy Ni (Yes or No) a young man tells his sweetheart he needs to leave her to join the Ukrainian Resistance (UPA), and asks for reassurance of her love for him. This song is about both kinds of sacrifice - that of active service, and that of undying love and moral support.

This brave army fought both Nazis and communists before, during and after WWII. Because it fought for justice and truth, it has had, and still has, many enemies. The Nazis are long gone, but communists and their sympathizers in the west as well as in the "post-soviet states" continue to demonize and slander it. In fact, Wikipedia had to lock edits to its entry on UPA because of "vandalism." Ганьба!

This song is a fitting tribute to the many brave souls who perished to save an ungrateful world from totalitarianism, and who continue to fight defamation and the right to acknowledgement of their significant contribution to planet Earth.

You can download it here.

4 comments:

Taras said...

It’s truly amazing that several generations of Ukrainian immigrants still speak Ukrainian and care about their mother country while millions of Ukrainians don’t.

Pawlina said...

Well, many diaspora Ukrainians had the benefit and good fortune of parents who took advantage of the freedom in their adopted homeland(s) to steep their children in the Ukrainain culture and language.

Others (like me) did not, but still care about their cultural heritage and are reclaiming what they can of it.

If indigenous Ukrainians strugging with their self-identity in the post-soviet milieu find our attempts inspiring, then we could hardly ask for anything more!

Anonymous said...

Hi Paulette.

I'm humbled.

Glad it means something to people. I just felt there was a need for an old fashioned style song albeit a bit contemprary in feel/presentation.

Having been posted a youtube link to a well intentioned but noisy rapping rock style song about UPA by a friend from Ukraine I was inspired to write a simple song.

I know all this new style stuff serves a purpose over there, maybe reaching an audience with a message they wouldn't get unless they listened to old marching songs, but one of the things I remember about old UPA songs was their simplicity as well as their tragic beauty.

Stepan aka Ludwig

Pawlina said...

Thanks, Ludwig, for the sentiments and the song!